Ultrasound School Overview

What is an Ultrasound Technologist?

Ultrasound, as its name suggests, is simply high-frequency sound. On the spectrum of all possible sound frequencies, the range of frequencies perceptible to humans is relatively small — between 20 hertz (Hz) and 20 kilohertz (kHz). Any frequency falling below that range is referred to as infrasound, while frequencies above it are considered ultrasound.

For the last 50 years, ultrasound has been an indispensable tool in the field of diagnostic medical imaging. The medical professionals who use it, ultrasound technologists, use reflected ultrasound waves to aid in the diagnosis of a variety of medical conditions.

Working with frequencies around 2 megahertz (MHz), or 2,000 kHz, ultrasound technologists, also called ultrasound technicians or diagnostic medical sonographers (see job description) use reflected ultrasound to generate photographic images, and even recorded video, of bone and tissue structures within the human body. These images provide physicians with a snapshot of the interior of the human body, allowing them to spot abnormalities and make a medical diagnosis without exposing patients to the radiation of x-rays.

Ultrasound Technician Schools

Schools for ultrasound and medical sonography are geared toward providing students with highly focused, real-world training they can use in a clinical environment. Though there is no level of training that is universally agreed upon for employment, employers tend to hire sonographers with an associate’s or bachelor’s in diagnostic medical sonography. Degrees are typically earned at a junior college, career school or hospital training facility. Here you can see a list of recommended ultrasound and sonography schools.

Use this site to find out more about ultrasound technologist training, find out about salary information or learn about the career outlook in sonography, to see if this expanding field sounds like the career choice for you.